Lo(no)go - 22 Create

Lo(no)go

by | Apr 18, 2018

A logo is a visual cornerstone of a companies brand. Not only is it used to communicate ownership, it can tell everyone who you are and what you do.

We live in a world so full of brands and advertisements it can be very difficult to stand out. Here are some of my little tips to create some truly kickass logos:

Keep it simple, stupid

Easier recognition is essential for a logo. If your logo is too complex, very few people will look at it long enough to understand the meaning behind it, even if it looks amazing. Not only this, but a simple logo is more versatile. It can be scaled down to fit on something like a postage stamp or scaled up to be as a big as a billboard.

Raster disaster

Don’t think Jamaican Rastafarians, think image quality. For those that don’t know, a raster graphic or image is composed of tiny little squares called pixels, that collate together to form an image. Using a raster image in a logo makes for very limited scalability because as soon as you increase the size, you’ll start to see the pixels. A logo should always be designed in a vector graphics programme (like Adobe Illustrator) which is made up of precise points, ensuring visual consistency across all sizes.

Avoid clichés

One of the most effective ways to come up with an original idea is to mind map, and a normal part of that process involves thinking of the obvious first. For example, what’s the first object you think of when I say the word ‘idea’? Now, feel free to stop and take a minute to think of something but chances are you said ( lightbulb ) – Select and copy within this space and paste in your browser to see if I’m right. Whilst it’s not a bad thing to think of the obvious, designing a truly distinctive logo requires a lot more thought.

Believe in yo’self

I often thought that the more logos I sent to a client improves the chance of them liking at least one, but this couldn’t be further from the truth. Not only does this make it look like you’ve put little thought into your designs, but it also disguises your favourite of the bunch; the one you dreamed the client would go for. A good rule is to only send three strong concepts, and be confident about doing it.

Take a look at some of the logos we’ve been designing, not too shabby ay?

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